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Vaccine Protects Us!

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VACCINATED IN ALL

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FAQ

Vaccination is the right choice to protect ourselves, our families, and society from COVID-19. Vaccination reduces risks of infection, serious complications, and death, being one of the most effective ways to stop the pandemic.

Vaccination is recommended even if you have had COVID-19 on the past because, according to available evidence, your body may not have developed an adequate immune response, putting you under a risk of reinfection.

To stop the pandemic, it is equally important to continue preventive measures alongside COVID-19 vaccination, such as facemask use, keeping a distance of at least one meter, and practicing hand hygiene.

COVID-19 vaccines, a result of unprecedented cooperation and enormous investments developed at record-breaking speeds, are in full compliance with relevant safety standards.

COVID-19 vaccines are used only after scrutinizing and analyzing clinical studies.

Some people may have allergic reactions to various allergens, such as penicillin or peanuts, wasp stings, and others. Similarly, COVID-19 vaccination may trigger certain allergic reactions.

Based on the World Health Organization’s recommendations, doctors examine the patient’s medical history for risks of possible severe reactions to the COVID-19 vaccine. The medical personnel of immunization-providing clinics are adequately trained to foresee such severe allergic reactions and take emergency measures to treat them.

Consequently, it is crucially important to inform doctors about any previous severe allergic reactions, especially if your situation call for adrenalin/epinephrine use or hospitalization.

As a rule, severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxes) to vaccination are rare and develop immediately, the reason why well-prepared personnel are perfectly capable of handling such situations.

You should contact a doctor immediately if you feel unwell after leaving a medical facility and suspect that you may have an allergic reaction.

Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA

Persons under 18 years of age.

People with a history of severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine, especially polyethylene glycol (PEG) and related molecules.

Anaphylactic reaction to the first vaccine dose, in which case the second dose is not administered.

Anyone with an acute illness (body temperature over 38.5 ºC) should postpone vaccination until healthy.

Four months (120 days) after being diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.

Persons who received monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma as part of COVID-19 treatment, in which case vaccination should be deferred for at least 90 days to avoid interference of the antibody treatment with vaccine-induced immune responses.

There should be a minimum interval of 14 days between administration of COVID-19 or any other vaccine against other conditions, except for tetanus and rabies prophylaxis administered without a 14-day interval.

 

AstraZeneca Vaccine

Persons under 45 years of age.

Hypersensitivity to the vaccine’s active substances or additives.

Anaphylactic reaction to the first vaccine dose, in which case the second dose is not administered.

Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HITT or HIT type 2).

Venous and/or arterial thrombosis with thrombocytopenia developed after immunization with any COVID-19 vaccine—in which case no second Astra Zeneca dose is given.

Anyone with an acute illness (body temperature over 38.5 ºC) should postpone vaccination until healthy.

Four months (120 days) after being diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.

There should be a minimum interval of 14 days between administration of COVID-19 or any other vaccine against other conditions, except for tetanus and rabies prophylaxis administered without a 14-day interval.

 

Sinopharm Inactivated Vaccine (Sinopharm)

Persons under 18 years of age.

Allergic reactions to the vaccine’s active substances or additives.

Anaphylactic reaction to the first vaccine dose, in which case the second dose is not administered, nor is it if there is an adverse reaction from the nervous system.

Allergic reaction to any previously administered vaccine (severe allergic reaction, angioneurotic edema, shortness of breath, and others).

Refractory epilepsy or other progressing neurological disorder, and underlying Guillain-Barre syndrome.

A terminal stage of a severe chronic disease, or some chronic diseases that may grow life-threatening at any moment.

Pregnancy.

Breastfeeding.

Anyone with an acute illness (body temperature over 38.5 ºC) should postpone vaccination until healthy.

Four months (120 days) after being diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.

There should be a one-month interval between immunoglobulin and COVID-19 vaccine shots.

There should be a minimum interval of 14 days between administration of COVID-19 or any other vaccine against other conditions, except for tetanus and rabies prophylaxis administered without a 14-day interval.

 

Sinovac Inactivated Vaccine (Sinovac)

Persons under 18 years of age.

Allergic reactions to any of the vaccine’s components.

Anaphylactic reaction to the first vaccine dose, in which case the second dose is not administered.

Pregnancy.

Breastfeeding.

Anyone with an acute illness (body temperature over 38.5 ºC) should postpone vaccination until healthy.

Four months (120 days) after being diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.

There should be a one-month interval between immunoglobulin and COVID-19 vaccine shots.

There should be a minimum interval of 14 days between administration of COVID-19 or any other vaccine against other conditions, except for tetanus and rabies prophylaxis administered without a 14-day interval.

The main goal of COVID-19 vaccines is to reduce overall virus infections, hospitalization, and mortality, all evidenced by studies. COVID-19 vaccines approved by the World Health Organization and used in Georgia: Pfizer-BioNTech, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Sinopharm, and Sinovac have an almost 100% success rate of protecting human beings from severe COVID-19 cases, hospitalization, and mortality. As for preventing symptomatic COVID-19, the picture varies by individual vaccine and is based on phase 3 trials described in the leaflet for each vaccine. Based on data from clinical studies and vaccination administration, the effectiveness rates of different vaccines fluctuate between 50% and 95%.

In addition, evidence is mounting throughout the world that COVID-19 vaccines not only protect from severe cases, hospitalization, and mortality, but also significantly reduce chances of virus transmission.

Similar to COVID-19, the COVID-19 vaccine is something new, explaining why healthcare experts are not sure at this point how long a person can be protected after beating the infection or getting vaccinated. On the other hand, it is common knowledge that COVID-19 has caused myriad complications and fatalities in the world.

Vaccination is the safest choice!

Vaccination may be accompanied by side effects, which is normal and indicative of your body developing immunity.

Either of the two doses of COVID-19 vaccines may be accompanied by the following side effects: local reaction (pain, swelling, redness), tiredness, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain, fever, nausea, swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy).

Just like any other vaccine or medication, COVID-19 vaccines may trigger particular side effects. But they are generally mild and temporary and, in most cases, persist only for three days after vaccination. However, if symptoms persist and you feel unwell, contact your family doctor immediately or call 1522.

For additional information, please visit ncdc.ge

Vaccination is recommended regardless of whether you already had COVID-19, because it is not clear at this point for how long after infection your body will remain immune.

Clinical studies suggest that using currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines is safe for those who have had COVID-19. Vaccination is offered regardless of the illness’ nature, symptomatic of asymptomatic. To make a decision on vaccination, it is not necessary to have severe infection diagnostics or serology tests done for possible COVID-19 infection.

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, it is recommended to postpone vaccinating patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection until they have recovered from the acute illness (if symptoms are present) and criteria for terminating isolation are met. This recommendation applies to patients with confirmed infections prior to the first dose or between the first and second doses.

Although a minimum interval is not recommended between infection and vaccination, the latest evidence suggests that COVID-19 reinfection risks remain low for several months, though they may increase over time due to reduced immunity. The delay period for those who have tested positive is set in Georgia at 120 days.

At this point, there are not sufficient studies and evidence on the safety and effectiveness of vaccination among pregnant women and children.

The World Health Organization recommends against COVID-19 vaccination among pregnant women, except in cases when the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks—for example, among healthcare workers with high risks of exposure to COVID-19 and pregnant women with underlying diseases who are in a high-risk group vulnerable to severe COVID-19. Pregnant women must be informed and consulted, if possible, on the scarcity of safety and effectiveness data.

Generally, based on available evidence and international practice, no premedication (for example, use of antihistamine or other medications in advance) or special examinations are necessary for vaccination. However, in some individual cases, the doctor makes a final decision based on consultations.